Grammy Awards formally recognize video game music

Grammy Awards formally recognize video game music  - 2011-04-12 04:38:29

The Academy has changed the language used to evaluate four existing categories.

The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences have made minor alterations to four categories in order to give video game music the same recognition as film and television scores. The four altered awards are as follows:

The Music for Visual Media (Motion, Television, Video Game Music, or Other Visual Media)

Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media (Motion, Television, Video Game Music, or Other Visual Media)

Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media (Motion, Television, Video Game Music, or Other Visual Media)

Best Song Written for Visual Media (Motion, Television, Video Game Music, or Other Visual Media)

Video games had previously been classified as "other visual media," and Bill Freimuth, VP of Awards for the Academy, believes that the amendment will help video game music achieve even greater mass appreciation.

"I think this could be viewed as a first step in the direction of video games getting their own category," Freimuth said. "Many people from the game community have been asking us to create a special category for games over the years but the main reason we haven’t is because we have received very few entries from game publishers."

Steve Schnur, an EA Worldwide music executive and a voting member on the Academy, has spent five years pushing for this type of recognition and believes that the change elevates the status of games relative to other media.

"This acknowledges that film, TV and games can stand side by side and be independently recognized," said Schnur.

"The recognition of video games within the Grammy Awards is not just significantly important for the interactive entertainment medium but it shows that the Academy recognizes games are important for the future growth of their audience."

At this year's ceremony, Christopher Tin's "Baba Yetu" became the first piece from a video game to win a Grammy, although the award was not related to the visual arts. The song first appeared in Civilization IV in 2005, but did not receive formal recognition until it was included on Tin's "Calling All Dawns" album in 2009.

Source: Industry Gamers