DuckTales Remastered (PS3) Review

Although I never owned the original DuckTales for the NES as a kid, I do have fond memories of being at friends’ houses and playing their copy of the game, and really enjoying the game, despite its difficulty.

When Capcom and WayForward announced that they were going to be releasing a re-mastered version, I found myself anxiously awaiting this game, not just to play it, but also in the hopes that if it does well enough, it will lead to more projects like it. With this new release, it’s not just a prettied up version of the original game as it takes the general gameplay and design of the original game, and then lovingly builds outwards, to create more comprehensive level design, difficulty, and an immersive gameplay experience. This game isn’t just for fans of the original, although that certainly is part of the appeal here. The nostalgia factor is high as the music throughout the game channels the DuckTales theme and assorted music, some of the voice talent from the DuckTales television series make appearances, and the game feels like a nice throwback to the platformers of yesteryear.

1.pngThe plot of the game is simple, with Scrooge McDuck on the trail of great treasure, bringing him to exotic locales, including the Amazon and the Moon. Along for the ride are Huey, Duey, Louie and Webby, often getting into trouble all on their own. After playing the initial level, you choose which local to go to next, to get the next major piece of treasure. The game is still challenging, and not necessarily forgiving. I started the game on its regular setting, and found it much tougher than I would have expected, although it did make it more enjoyable as if it had been too easy it wouldn’t have been as satisfying a gameplay experience.

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Visually, this game is superb. The visuals channel the essence of the original, but are nicely cleaned up and look like they’re taken right from the television show. There are some nice touches added in here, such as the ability to swim in Scrooge McDuck’s fabled money bin. And really, what child of the late ‘80s/early ‘90s hadn’t wished they could do that, and now you can, after a fashion. This game is immensely entertaining, not to mention challenging. I can only hope that sometime soon Rescue Rangers will get the same treatment.

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