Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition (PS4) Review – Street Fighter V, For Real This Time

Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition (PS4) Review - Street Fighter V, For Real This Time

When Street Fighter V was released a few years ago the reception was understandably mixed. The fighting mechanics were rock solid. Obviously. This is Street Fighter that we’re talking about. The problem was that everything else around it felt like a shell of a full game that was meant to be completed through DLC greed. It didn’t kill the reputation of the franchise because Street Fighter is one of those legacy video game titles that will always be adored by anyone who enjoys the carpal tunnel syndrome inducing joy of mastering a fighting game. It did, however, feel like somewhat of a slap in the face to anyone who had stuck by the franchise for so long.

It took a while, but Capcom listened to the complaints and finally made things right. Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition fills in all of those irritating gaps in the original release. Best of all, for those who bought the original release and felt disappointed, all of the new content will be automatically updated for free. For those who held off, now you get everything all at once including the 12 DLC characters that were slowly passed out to those disappointed fans who picked up this game too early.

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Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition (PS4) – gameplay screenshots for this review provided by Capcom.

The first big addition to the game is ideal for all my fellow Street Fighter nostalgics out there. It’s an arcade single-player mode that allows you to fight through a tower of opponents themed to Street Fighter I-V. Each challenge contains only the characters from the original game (in the old-timey costumes no less) and even the barrel breaking bonus stages and old music return. There’s also a vast number of endings available depending on which era you beat with which character. In accordance with Street Fighter convention, it’s still art with text. But, they are always playful and reverent to the franchise. Unlockable artwork tied to the character’s journey will also appear, so gaming hoarders have hours of obsessive fun ahead of them through this mode alone.

The rest of the new additions are slightly less substantial and will roll out after the release. There’s a Team Battle mode that’s a pretty simple way for a group of up to five players to organize a couch co-op mini tournament with some minor tweaks available like how much health is carried over for the winner between rounds. There are Extra Battle and Special Challenges with unlockables (costumes, exp, fight money, etc.) available to players who enjoy such things, some of which will be available only for a limited time to get achievement hoarding gamers addicted. There’s also an update in training mode that allows you to view colour-coordinated frame data for each move so that you can spot hidden weaknesses and openings when learning new fighters or learning how to defeat ones who always give you trouble. A little update, but one that could help a great deal when you enter the painfully competitive world of online fighting games. Overall, there’s nothing too much new here for anyone other than the Street Fighter obsessives, but it still helps fill out the overall content.

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Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition (PS4) – gameplay screenshots for this review provided by Capcom.

In terms of gameplay, it’s essentially the same as the original release with the addition of new V-triggers. These are special moves that players acquire after taking a substantial amount of damage during a fight and are essentially defensive attacks that can transform any repetitive attack that your opponent has been laying on thick into a devastating counter that can turn a whole fight around. It’s a nice addition that should add a new level of strategy to online play until certain players inevitably find a way to turn them into cheap ways to garner easy comeback victories. But you know what? In cases like that, you’ve got to turn that old adage around and hate the player, not the game. It is quite a clever new strategic feature to add to the Street Fighter playbook that has been going strong for over 20 years.

Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition (PS4) Review - Street Fighter V, For Real This Time
Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition (PS4) – gameplay screenshots for this review provided by Capcom.

So, there’s no denying that Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition is a vast improvement on the lacklustre original release. All of the lacking content is finally here and there are a handful of clever new editions to keep players coming back. It’s certainly nice that Capcom made the Arcade edition a free upgrade for players who felt let down by the original release and there’s no denying that anyone who hasn’t picked up Street Fighter V yet should rush to this version instead (especially since it comes with all of the DLC that came out between the two editions as well). However, something about the whole thing still leaves an icky taste in my mouth. Players who paid full price for Street Fighter V back in 2016 should have gotten all this content.

It’s only when you add everything together in the Arcade Edition that Street Fighter V feels like a full and satisfying triple-A title release. It’s a shame that we’ve all accepted our place on the commercial treadmill that gaming developers have created, where we have to assume that any game we buy at launch is at least ¾ of what’s actually planned for the title. We have to decide whether to slowly keep buying more DLC add-ons (don’t worry, there’s still another new season worth of DLC characters coming for you to buy) or wait a few years for a complete edition, by which time the game is passé. It’s really irritating and Capcom deservingly got called out for holding back content on the original release of Street Fighter V. Sure, it’s nice of them to release all this content for free to players who have stuck by the game for two years, but that feels like too little too late. Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition would have been an absolutely fantastic fighting game had all this content came out on the original release date. It’s still a damn fine fighting game now, but the motives behind how long it took for this full game to finally hit shelves and hard drives remain questionable and frustrating.

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Street Fighter V: Arcade Edition (PS4) – gameplay screenshots for this review provided by Capcom.

Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out Phil’s take on Blade Runner 2049, Happy Death Day, and It! He also had a chance to sit down with Guillermo Del Toro. Check out his interview here!

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Okami HD (PS4) Review: The Littlest Hobo of Our Times

Okami HD (PS4) Review: The Littlest Hobo of Our Times

Okami HD is the dog game I’ve always wanted to play, capturing the joy and laughter that having a loving canine brings to a life. It’s simply a delight to take off with Amaterasu (Ammy) into the fields, watching flowers spring up with her every step. It’s endlessly charming to see people light up at her presence or when she helps solve their problems. Everywhere Ammy goes, she improves the lives of those around her.

Ammy may be a goddess, but that doesn’t stop her from digging up gardens, nipping at people, and sitting there with a playful grin on her face, wagging her tail as people deliver important information to her (or nodding off if the information is too boring and longwinded). There is a playfulness in her actions, and in those the player can carry out, right on down to having a button dedicated to barking. It loads every moment in the game, no matter how serious, with a playful nature that gets you in the mindset of a dog.

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Okami HD (PlayStation 4) – gameplay image via Capcom.

Okami HD’s character visuals strengthen this sense. The game features a sort of trembling animation style where the character’s outlines seem to be in constant motion. It’s a neat effect that infuses the game with a light, fun nature, and specifically makes Ammy feel cheerful and bouncy. The shuddering style makes her look like she is always panting, or that wind is moving through her fur. It’s a subtle effect that seems to make her appearance all the more endearing, which is quite a feat given she has few facial features with which to be expressive.

This doesn’t mean that she’s a faceless character in the game world, though. She continually shows her emotions with a tilt of the head, a wag of her tail, or a little whine or bark. It’s small stuff, but creates this sense of serenity alongside her playfulness. Her motions are subtle, implying a calm observation of the events around her. In this, she feels like a goddess. But she’s also a dog, and a tail wag tells the player she’s happy to play or pleased to see someone. She carries herself with the grace of a deity, but still has that same sense of fun one sees in their family dog.

Ammy’s warmth is matched by her courage in Okami HD. The people of Nippon are under siege by Orochi, an eight-headed beast that has polluted the land with evil and darkness. Ammy doesn’t hesitate to fight the servants of this beast, throwing herself into battle to save Nippon’s people and spirits.

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Okami HD (PlayStation 4) – gameplay image via Capcom.

When making contact with a foe, players will appear in temporary arenas with a variety of demonic creatures (all of which feature some sharp appearances filled with folkloric nods), many of which have unique abilities and quirks to deal with that make combat involved. Ammy can clobber these foes with an array of discs and sub-weapons, or draw upon her magical painting skills to cut through weaknesses.

Okami HD’s painting abilities add a lot of unique abilities to combat and beyond. Ammy can call upon a magical paintbrush that players will use to draw different symbols, each of which has differing effects in or out of combat. Players can draw a line through a foe to cut through defences, create a circle with a swipe through it for a bomb, draw dots to create protective trees, and more. Outside of battle, they can use these powers as well as draw healing circles to repair damaged trees (in a brilliant display of cherry blossoms), create objects for people, or change the world with a stroke of a brush just about anywhere.

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Okami HD (PlayStation 4) – gameplay image via Capcom.

Combat is where the game is its least compelling, though. Many foes seem to just goof around while the player bashes them, with combat being a chaotic mess of enemies bouncing around while the player stomps them. Adding the painting abilities only seems to give the player more of an edge, draining the challenge out of things. When facing the more challenging bosses, though, difficulty can spike in ways the player isn’t prepared for, and Ammy’s flailing attacks become a hindrance that makes it hard to avoid damage. It feels sloppy, but it is functional.

The aftermath shows where the strengths are in Okami HD. When enemies are defeated, the darkened land they inhabited fills with flowers, with plants shooting from the ground. It creates that same pleasant sensation one gets from a game of Flower, where the player’s actions fill a world with life. There is also powerful joy in seeing clean water and new trees spring from a place evil once held.

That same pleasure can be felt from helping people around the world. Like the NPC quests from Yakuza 0, it feels good to help people in Okami HD. As you replace lost wash poles, help a warrior build confidence, or dig up turnips for a child’s delight, it feels like getting to know friends and neighbors. It builds a sense of fun community with the game’s funny NPCs and offers a feeling of improving the world with your canine sense of good will.

It all looks lovely on the PS4 as well. Sharp colours spring from the screen and the world teems with both darkness and light depending on what the player is doing. The vibrant world deserves to be seen with the best colours and sharpest lines, unsullied by the game’s age, and it looks stunning despite the years that have passed.

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Okami HD (PlayStation 4) – gameplay image via Capcom.

Okami HD is a good action game, but it is a better game about how a dog can enhance a life. Ammy is a wonderful protagonist with a natural puppy charm, one who steals every scene with her playful yet serene expressions, and through her big heart improves the lives of those around her. She digs up the yard sometimes and barks a lot, but she means well, making the world a better, happier, brighter, and funnier place.

A retail version of the game reviewed was provided by the publisher. You can find additional information about CGMagazine’s ethics and review policies and procedures here.


Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out more of Joel Couture’s reviews such as Fight’N Rage, The Evil Within 2, and Outlast 2!

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Why Monster Hunter World Will Succeed in the West

Why Monster Hunter World Will Succeed in the West

The Monster Hunter series is one of the most successful franchises in Capcom’s repertoire, having sold 40 million units according to Capcom’s latest sales data. But most of those sales have come from Japan, where Monster Hunter’s emphasis on grouping together with friends to take down monsters in local multiplayer found a larger audience in the series homeland than in the more online multiplayer-focused West. Which is why Capcom’s focus on attracting Western audiences with the upcoming Monster Hunter World, is all the more surprising—most of all, because it has the best shot at finally propelling the series to success outside of Japan.

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Monster Hunter Worlds – gameplay image via Capcom

The upcoming free beta for Monster Hunter World, is set to run from December 9 to December 12 on the PlayStation 4, is Capcom’s latest move to ensure that success is indeed found. The beta features three quests across two different zones for players to explore and hunt, which can be completed in single player or multiplayer. It’s similar to the demos of the game that Capcom has shown at previous events, including Tokyo Game Show and Gamescom. The inclusion of online multiplayer in the beta is what makes it stand out, as this will be the first chance for Monster Hunter to show what its greatest strength is—taking down giant monsters with friends.

But for the decade old franchise to capture a new audience, changes both minor and major have to be made to ensure it sticks the landing. Monster Hunter’s appeal often lies in the complex, challenging systems that force players to undergo hours and hours of tutorials before stepping out to try their hand at taking down one of the tougher and more impressive monsters. It took several attempts across multiple games before Monster Hunter could finally sink its teeth into me, and I was happy to see that Monster Hunter World felt intuitively good to play when I tried it out for the first time at PAX West.

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Monster Hunter Worlds – gameplay image via Capcom

One of the primary reasons why is because playing Monster Hunter with a controller feels right at home for anyone who has played any of the Souls-inspired games on console. The shift in focus from handheld devices to modern consoles is a transparent attempt to appeal to players in North America and Europe since Monster Hunter has always found its greatest success with its handheld titles in Japan. Whether or not Japanese fans will follow Monster Hunter through its platform change remains to be seen, which is why Capcom’s focus on Western audiences is a big risk for the franchise.

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Monster Hunter Worlds – gameplay image via Capcom

Outside of the platform change, Capcom has aimed to reduce as much of the clutter and idiosyncrasies that have helped to define the franchise through the years. Some changes such as the scout flies, a glowing green cloud of insects that reveal objects of interest or can follow a monster’s trail, the ability to switch weapons while on a hunt and the addition of drop-in/drop-out multiplayer are all intended to lower the difficulty curve for newcomers. This all speaks to a Monster Hunter that is more exciting and accessible than past titles have been, and even though some of the changes have longtime fans worried, it is ultimately still a game where the act of taking down a monster with powerful and often insane weapons feels just as good.

Monster Hunter World is Capcom’s biggest push to attract Western audiences in franchise history. With the beta taking place this coming weekend, Capcom and Monster Hunter faithful fans—such as myself—will be hoping that this will be enough to get more than just franchise fans talking about Monster Hunter World when it launches on PS4 and Xbox One on January 26, 2018. What’s more, Capcom will be aiming to capture an entirely different and possibly wider audience when it launches on PC later in 2018, which currently only has Dauntless to satiate the thirst of those looking to team up and hunt giant beasts.

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Monster Hunter Worlds – gameplay image via Capcom

Capcom has spent years slowly laying the foundations for Monster Hunter to succeed outside of Japan, though it’s a gradual change, and their newest instalment will be the ultimate test. Because if this push doesn’t bring the success Capcom is aiming for, I’m not sure if Monster Hunter will ever catch on in the West.


Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out more by Preston Dosza here and here!

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Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen (PlayStation 4) Review – A Soulless Pawn

Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen (PlayStation 4) Review - A Soulless Pawn

From the game’s opening battle against a Chimera, to a throw-down with a dragon moments later, and then finding yourself scaling a Cyclops after that, Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen often plays like a frantic action game with an open world shell. Doing so with a party of custom chosen AI killers only adds to this wild feeling. Yet there’s something about the game that feels oddly lifeless and empty, dragging down what should have been an exciting fantasy hack and slash romp.

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Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen (PlayStation 4) – gameplay image via Capcom.

The game features a highly robust character creation system, allowing players to run a gamut of sizes, heights, and ages. Not that this is uncommon for character creators, but the visual appearance of these differences in weight, and age, all make sweeping changes to the character. Geriatric swordsmen, child mage prodigies, and true monstrosities are open to create.

Players can also choose from several classes—melee, magic, range, and speed—at the start, with more becoming available later. These have their own combat moves, most of which can be equipped to whichever button you like to be used on the fly during battles. They can also easily swap between two weapons with another button press, allowing players to shuffle through several combat builds in seconds.

This is handy since the fields throughout the game are far from empty. Many open world games offer a little bit of solitude, with enemies only showing up periodically—Skyrim and Fallout 4 can often be pretty quiet—but Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen has foes popping up constantly. Rest feels like the most uncommon experience, making travel more exciting and dangerous, but also more tedious when you’re in a hurry and keep getting flanked by wolves or thugs.

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Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen (PlayStation 4) – gameplay image via Capcom.

Don’t expect easy fights, either. Taking a page from the early Dragon Quest games, if you head somewhere you really shouldn’t be yet, you’ll find high-powered enemies that will stomp you flat. This might have been a good way to indicate where the player should be going, but the game autosaves infrequently, and dying means going back to your last save, forcing some constant—somewhat annoying—manual saving, or even more frustrating losses of progress.

You would think you’d be able to survive a little easier when you have three AI companions with you. Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen’s pawn system is arguably its most interesting feature, having players create or hire a couple of extra AI warriors who follow them into combat to back them up. These characters can be quite helpful, as they’ll fill in gaps in your character’s abilities, but they’re still just AIs, so don’t expect amazing quality backup.

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Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen (PlayStation 4) – gameplay image via Capcom.

Players will custom build one character, giving them a solid constant companion. The others can be drawn from an online pool of characters made by other players. The neat part of the online ones is that they come with experience based on what their creator has done with them. If they have already fought an enemy or know an area, they will provide you with information or walk the best routes—although these ones have a cost to hire especially if they’re higher than your level. Also, if someone uses your character online, they will bring back handy items.

The worst part about these characters, though, is they never, ever shut up. Turning off chatter is a must. However, they will still babble their words on screen, which can cover a section of the battle, which is almost more annoying.

Having a group makes each fight feel like a grand melee. The game isn’t shy to have you fighting almost constantly because you always have some backup to heal or battle alongside you, keeping the player swept up in the excitement of the fray. It can get irritating when they won’t disengage with a powerful enemy you’re trying to flee—as you need to revive them if you don’t want them to disappear from your party—though.

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Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen (PlayStation 4) – gameplay image via Capcom.

As for fleeing, running requires stamina—it’s the only thing that does—and your character has awful cardio. It’s very hard to put distance between you and a dangerous foe, as your character is constantly stopping due to exhaustion—although AI partners can refill some of it when they catch up to you. It’s worse when just travelling the fields, as you’re getting exhausted every few steps. It’s a nuisance when fleeing, but its downright enraging when taking a long walk.

Considering how often the player, three AI characters, and a ton of wolves or thieves might be duking it out, the game’s visuals run smoothly with few hiccups. The upgrade to PlayStation 4 visuals also looks nice in motion, but don’t expect something on par with Yakuza Kiwami. The game shows its age, with some weird looking faces and monsters—for example, the dragon from the opening battle. Its music is still gorgeous though. It has the ability to create a soothing mood or stir up a will to fight when the situation calls for it.

Despite all of these aspects to make combat exciting, it feels like there’s little narrative impetus to go out into the world. While players often just strike out into the world and do what they want in open world games anyway, it often feels like that’s all there is to do in Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen. Beyond taking on quests on boards that ask you to kill a set amount of enemies or foes in a certain place, the game’s vague, dull story rarely makes an appearance. It often feels like you’re just filling out grocery lists of monster executions instead of working through an epic quest.

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Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen (PlayStation 4) – gameplay image via Capcom.

It’s that lack of story and reasons to do things that left the game’s world feeling as lifeless as the AI pawns you create. Fighting is solid, having partners makes those battles feel delightfully chaotic, and the game can be a real challenge, but it feels like Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen can’t create a good reason to go out and put these things to work.

Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen was reviewed using “retail” PlayStation 4 download codes provided by Capcom. You can find additional information about CGMagazine’s ethics and review policies and procedures here.


Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out Joel’s review of Dishonored: Death of the Outsider, or his review of the cyberpunk thriller, Ruiner!

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CGMagazine is Canada’s premiere comics and gaming magazine. Subscribe today to get the best of CGM delivered right to your door! Never miss when a new issue goes live by subscribing to our newsletter! Signing up gives you exclusive entry into our contest pool. Sign up once, you’ll have a chance to win! Sign up today!

Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite (Xbox One) Review – It Wants to Take You for a Ride

Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite (Xbox One) Review - It Wants to Take You for a Ride

I grew up playing Capcom’s seemingly forgotten Marvel-themed fighting games from X-men: Children of the Atom to Marvel Super Heroes and the vs. Street Fighter follow-up. I loved them all, mostly because I was a huge X-men fan and Cyclops’ super move was a beam that filled the screen and as a young boy that was all I could ask for. Yeah, I’m a Cyclops fanboy, so what?

Now, over two decades after Children of the Atom’s release, the fourth game in the Marvel vs. Capcom series is releasing into a world filled with tons of competitive fighters, including the popular DC Comics-based Injustice series made by the creators of Mortal Kombat. Does Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite do enough to stand out in an already crowded genre?

I think so.

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Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite (Xbox One) – gameplay images via Capcom.

Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite is an ugly game, let’s just get that out of the way. The character models are less than impressive with faces that resemble knockoff Halloween masks of popular comic book and video game characters. Mega Man X has what I’d call ‘dead eyes’ that stare off into the distance and Ryu has a permanently scrunched up nose like a dog growling at something. Basically, every human character just looks off. This fact is highlighted by lengthy cutscenes in the story mode that often show close-ups of characters speaking where, at times,  the words don’t even remotely sync up to their mouths.

Once you accept that and move on, there is a pretty decent fighting game here.

The story mode took me around three-and-a-half hours, which I’d say was split nearly evenly between cutscenes, fighting, and loading screens. The cutscenes feature all the heroic characters from both Marvel Comics and Capcom games joining forces to stop a common enemy that has used the Infinity Stones to converge their universes together. Cutscenes seem to vary in quality depending on whether or not they are pre-rendered or using the in-game models, which isn’t so bad (unless you’re looking for it).

The voice acting is hit and miss, with characters like Chris Redfield of Resident Evil,  Frank West of Dead Rising, and Iron Man faring pretty well. Iron Man’s voice actor does a pretty good Robert Downey Jr. impression, which helps, even if the character isn’t written nearly as witty as he has been in recent Marvel films. Other characters are bland or just plain bad such as Morrigan, the Scottish succubus who either has a voice actress that does a terrible attempt at an accent or I’ve just become used to overstated Duck Tales-like Scottish accents.

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Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite (Xbox One) – gameplay images via Capcom.

The selection of characters here includes those that are popular in the Marvel cinematic universe right now and a hodgepodge of Capcom characters, many of which the company itself seems to have forgotten. The Devil May Cry 3 version of Dante is in, as well as the “hot dog armed” Spencer from the remake of Bionic Commando—for some reason. Also in the game are Arthur and Firebrand from the Ghosts N’ Goblins series, a series that hasn’t seen a proper console release in over a decade. While the character choices are strange, as a fan of old-school Capcom games I can appreciate including lesser known characters.

Sadly, many of the characters in Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite are played and acted in a very serious manner which doesn’t mesh well with a game where characters include a talking raccoon that rides a tree person and a shirtless mayor that beats people with steel pipes and throws metal barrels. However, there are a few times where characters get downright campy which are the best moments of the entire story. The narrative would have been so much better off if it wasn’t played so straight-faced for the most part.

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Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite (Xbox One) – gameplay images via Capcom.

While I enjoyed the story, it wasn’t anything all that impressive (especially when compared to some recent offerings from NetherRealm Studios) and mostly consists of the heroes splitting up and flying or teleporting to areas where the Infinity Stones are while also engaging in some witty banter. Perhaps unsurprisingly the female characters mostly take a back seat to their male counterparts, on whom the spotlight is heavily focused. However, the developers did find time to give a lot of screen time to the scantily clad Morrigan, because of course they did. That said Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite may have some of the best and most well-defined male butts in a game, which I quite enjoyed. Captain America clearly does not skip squat day at the gym.

I’d estimate the battles in story mode consist of 50 percent fighting boring Ultron Drones and 50 percent fighting the few villains in the game. I don’t understand why Capcom would make you fight such dull basic robots so many times when it has such a colourful cast of characters at its disposal. It wouldn’t be so bad if the drones didn’t have rather basic move sets that make these fights feel more like a beat ’em up brawl instead of a match in a fighting game. At least the final boss is enjoyable, foregoing the steep difficulty fighting game bosses are known for.

When it comes to the fighting Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite has something for both casual players and pros alike, although I don’t know if the latter will adopt it as heavily as past games. The story teaches players the basics of the game without being a boring tutorial (there is a separate Missions mode for that) including how to tag between your two characters, perform an auto-combo that just requires mashing the low punch button over and over again, as well as the use of the Infinity Stones.

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Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite (Xbox One) – gameplay images via Capcom.

One of six Infinity Stones is selected before each match outside of story mode, each with their own special move and mode to activate with added effects. One stone lets players dash back and forth quickly, another shoots a ball of energy just in front of them, while others quickly fill up your super meter’s energy or allow you to temporarily fight with both of your characters at once. While some stones feel stronger than others, none of them felt overpowered. However, it is still early for the full competitive metagame to develop.

Most of the special moves are done via a quarter circle followed by an attack button, with supers pulled off by doing a quarter circle and pressing both low and high attack buttons at once. Alternatively, for the less savvy players, there is the ability to simple press high punch and kick at the same time to activate one of their character’s supers.

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Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite (Xbox One) – gameplay images via Capcom.

In a world with so many fighting games that require split-second reflexes, it is nice to see Capcom include options for new players (or aging players with failing reflexes) to be able to enjoy Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite. Auto-comboing will make anyone feel like they are kicking ass, even if the combo each character does is nearly identical in execution. Being able to pull off a super move without doing half circles is welcome as well. I do wonder, however, if the accessibility will drive some competitive players away, perhaps dismissing it as a fighting game for casuals. I suppose only the future will tell.

I attempted to play online via matchmaking without success on the release night of Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite, as every search for a game came up empty-handed. It is unclear if this means there is something wrong on the technical side of things, or if players just opted to get the game on platforms other than Xbox One. I was eventually able to search for and find a lobby with seven other players in it. The fights were smooth and it felt like I was sitting in the room with the other player—aside from one match where my connection to the other player wasn’t the best. That match was basically unplayable thanks to constant stuttering, hitching, and lagging.

Results may vary.

Otherwise, from a technical standpoint Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite has a couple niggling issues. One being the aforementioned load times, which can range anywhere from 30 seconds to around a minute in story mode, usually when switching from a cutscene to a fight. While this might not seem like a lot of time, I don’t feel like I was exaggerating when I said it made up close to a third of my time in the story mode. The other issue was a smidgen of framerate stability issues during the slow motion, last hit of the fight. Thankfully it doesn’t impact gameplay.

Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite (Xbox One) Review - It Wants to Take You for a Ride 7
Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite (Xbox One) – gameplay images via Capcom.

If you’re one of those people annoyed by DLC characters being included with the base game “on the disc” then prepare to be… annoyed. The story mode has a section with both Black Panther and a lady Monster Hunter character, both of which are to be released as DLC, as well as Ultron Sigma as the main villain, who is also part of the season pass. Surprise! It’s a AAA video game in 2017 with a season pass for content seemingly on the disk (at the very least partially).

I went into Marvel vs. Capcom: Infinite bracing for the worst, but once I got past the ugly character models I discovered a rather decent fighting game that is approachable for old players and newcomers alike. While it doesn’t reinvent the wheel or do anything all that original, it’s still a fun romp and one that I could see kids absolutely loving like I loved the video game forefathers of this series. Oh, and you can play as Nemesis from Resident Evil, who takes up the whole screen and shoots a rocket launcher, so there is that.


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Marvel Vs Capcom Infinite DLC Characters For 2017 confirmed

Marvel Vs Capcom Infinite DLC Characters For 2017 confirmed

With the release of Marvel Vs. Capcom Infinite around the corner, Capcom took the opportunity to announce that the title will indeed be receiving new fighters in the form of downloadable content scheduled for the rest of 2017 after the game launches this coming Tuesday.

It should be noted that currently only four characters have been confirmed by Capcom as being new additions to the roster in the form of DLC. The four confirmed characters are set to release this year, meaning that Capcom may have plans for more characters down the road in 2018.

Now on to the confirmed characters themselves:

Female Monster Hunter  The hero character from Capcom’s popular Monster Hunter series. She already appears within the story campaign of Marvel Vs Capcom Infinite, in a scene in with Marvel’s Black Panther. She appears to wield a big sword which is reminiscent of some of the heavy weapons available in Monster Hunter.

Black Widow  A highly requested character that will finally be joining the roster of fighters sometime in 2017. Portrayed by Scarlett Johansson in the films, Black Widow is an ultra-powerfulFemme Fatale who is an expert in Martial Arts and espionage.

The Winter Soldier  Another character popularized in the recent Marvel movie adaptions. The Winter Soldier, otherwise known as Bucky Barnes, was a childhood friend of Captain America who turned into a weaponized killing machine by the evil hands of Hydra.

Venom  One of the mainstays from the Marvel Vs Capcom series, Venom will be returning to the series sometime in 2017. Venom, like previously entries in the series, will feature a fighting style similar to that of Spider-Man, with the added brute strength of the alien symbiote suit.

No further information is available at this time in regards to future additions to the roster. However, characters such as the Black Panther who is featured throughout the story mode, is curiously absent from the list of actual playable fighters. Speculating on several missing characters may suggest that Capcom is planning on adding the likes of Black Panther and perhaps more characters in 2018.

Marvel Vs Capcom Infinite will be available Tuesday, September, 19, 2017 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC.

SEGA, Capcom and ATLUS Team Up For Latest Humble Bundle

SEGA, Capcom and ATLUS Team Up For Latest Humble Bundle

Earlier today, SEGA announced a collaboration between Capcom and ATLUS in the efforts to bring great Japanese video games to the latest iteration of the Humble Bundle.

In addition to supporting the Humble Bundle, all three legendary game publishers are also proudly supporting several charities exclusively for this Humble Bundle. Those interested in the specific charities can view them below:

World Wildlife Fund – World’s leading independent conservation organization charity.

Games Aid – Video games industry-based charity that distributes funds to a diverse range of charities.

Access Sport – Charity whose mission is to give more children access to a wide range of quality inclusive sport.

Special Effect – Charity that creates custom built technology to help people with physical disabilities play video games.

The trio of renowned Japanese games publishers have come together and brought with them an assortment of 12 hit games in the Humble Tri-Publisher Bundle.

Those who donate $1 or more will receive:

  • Rollers of the Realm
  • Zeno Clash 2
  • Sonic Adventure 2
  • Bionic Commando
  • Citizens of Earth

Those who pay more than the average will receive:

  • Renegade Ops Collection
  • Sonic Generations Collection
  • Resident Evil 4
  • Dead Rising
  • Telsa Effect: A Murphy Adventure
  • 50% off Dawn of War III
  • 50% off Street Fighter V
  • 50% previously released Steam title from SEGA, Capcom or Atlus
  • 66% off The Deadly Towers of Monsters

Those who pay more than $12 will receive:

 Motorsport Manager

  • Devil May Cry 4 Special Edition

Overall, the games on offer seem to be a great collection of genres that include action, adventure, horror, role playing and more.  Some standout titles include the likes of Resident Evil 4, Sonic Generations, Devil May Cry 4 and Citizens of Earth. Players itching to expand their Steam library of games should consider checking out the Humble Tri-Publisher Bundle which is available until the end of September.

Those unfamiliar with the Humble Bundle, the service offers players with an eclectic assortment of games every month from various publishers and developers. The best part of the Humble Bundle is that the revenue generated from sales is then given to various charitable organizations around the world at the discretion of the consumer.