Crossing Souls (PC) Review – Lost Boys

Crossing Souls (PC) Review - Lost Boys

I can’t help but wonder if “80’s-stalgia” has begun to plateau in its popularity. While I often think I was born in the wrong time, and wish I could’ve spent my formative years witnessing the birth of the NES and the Golden-Age of gaming, I’m beginning to wonder if products like Stranger Things, IT, and maybe even as far back as Kung-Fury have ignited the “80s as a theme” popularity to the point of cynicism. I wonder this because of Crossing Souls, a wonderfully crafted—albeit flawed—story driven Beat ‘Em Up that is almost wholly “inspired” by the movies and cartoons of the 80s.

Crossing Souls (PC) Review - Lost Boys 2
Crossing Souls (PC) – image for this review provided by Fourratic and Devolver Digital.

Crossing Souls tells the story of a group of friends who discover “The Duat,” a mysterious stone that drains the life of any who possess it for too long.  When the Data of the group, Matt, creates a device that allows them to tap into the Duat’s power, they find they can see the world of the spirits and are able to move within it. What follows is a whirlwind adventure involving life, death, government conspiracies and a plot to rule the world. It’s Stand By Me meets The Goonies meets a Saturday morning cartoon.

Gameplay is actually fairly similar to that of Hyper Light Drifter, but while more linear than that game, players explore each level from a top-down perspective that is somehow flat yet distinctly layered; fighting off wild animals and corrupted spirits. Players can control each of the friends, all of whom have their own unique abilities and playstyles. The leader of the group, Chris, has a trusty baseball bat and can knock back enemy projectiles. Matt has a laser gun and rocket shoes, Big Joe is the strongest, capable of dealing the most damage and also has the most health, and Charlie—who actually plays a little bit like the Drifter—uses a similar dash move and has a jumping rope that gives her a decent range for a melee character.

Crossing Souls (PC) Review - Lost Boys 5
Crossing Souls (PC) – image for this review provided by Fourratic and Devolver Digital.

This distinction in characters does come into play in the platforming sections as well as the fact that certain characters are needed to get across certain gaps—Chris is the only character who can jump and climb things, Matt’s aforementioned rocket shoes allow him to glide short distances, Big Joe can push heavy objects, and Charlie can slingshot herself across large gaps. The game does an excellent job of making each character feel unique and each one is so charming and likeable that it’s hard to choose a favourite; further playing into the idea that each one is necessary for the adventure.

The last and most interesting gameplay mechanic does get a little into spoiler territory, so reader be warned. The final member of the group whom I have yet to mention is Chris’ little brother Kevin. When a sinister gang leader tries to steal the Duat and smashes its containment device, Kevin runs off with it—which inevitably kills him. After Matt rebuilds the device, the gang reunites with Kevin, now a ghost. This allows Kevin to move through solid doors, interact with certain spirits, and jump on phantasmal platforms (although he has no combat ability to speak of). This actually makes for a pretty interesting turn in the story and adds a nice layer to hopping in and out of the spirit world.

Crossing Souls (PC) Review - Lost Boys 6
Crossing Souls (PC) – image for this review provided by Fourratic and Devolver Digital.

However, the gameplay isn’t perfect. Platforming can be a little tedious given the game’s perspective, and sometimes when you think you’re about to jump onto a platform, you end up landing behind it, or behind a pillar that appeared as a platform. Also, unlike Hyper Light Drifter—which perfectly blended melee with gunplay and precision dashing—Crossing Souls’ combat is a bit clunky and often more aggravating than fun.

For starters, enemies aren’t really affected by attacks, never being knocked back or stunned, so trying for combo attacks usually ends up in taking a hit. What’s worse is that there is a stamina meter that is drained with every attack and dodge, and while this kind of element adds a lot to a game like Dark Souls—where every fight is a precise blend of attacking, dodging and managing stamina—in a Beat ‘Em Up like this, it just makes things incredibly frustrating when you start a string of attacks and try to dodge an incoming attack from a second enemy only to get stunned from a lack of stamina and end up taking a hit from a third.

The stamina bar is also depleted by platforming, which makes sense for things like Matt’s hover ability or Chris’ climbing ability, but should have been reserved for the platforming alone since the meat of the game (the combat) is throttled by something that significantly limits your ability to move and fight.

Crossing Souls (PC) Review - Lost Boys 4
Crossing Souls (PC) – image for this review provided by Fourratic and Devolver Digital.

Also, while the game encourages diversity in the characters, the limitation of the stamina meter really only makes Big Joe a worthwhile combatant, since he can fell most enemies in two or three hits. If you wanted to use a character like Charlie, who deals out less damage but theoretically can move quicker and hit farther, you’re definitely going to take a lot of hits.

My biggest problem with the game is definitely the era in which it is set. Crossing Souls leans way too heavily on 80’s references, almost to the point where it feels cynical. There’s a part where you’re on a bridge, outrunning a train. There’s a part where you’re in a Delorean. The world is littered with faux-references to movies and videogames to the point where you almost want to say, “We get it, it’s the 80s.” Unlike the first season of Stranger Things, which used 80’s movies and tropes as inspiration to create something original, Crossing Souls just throws out reference after reference as if to say, “Hey, 80’s stuff right? These were things from the 80s.”

Crossing Souls (PC) Review - Lost Boys 8
Crossing Souls (PC) – image for this review provided by Fourratic and Devolver Digital.

However, these problems aside, the game does play very well, although I did notice some significant lag in some of the more populated areas. It has a beautiful 16-bit aesthetic that is filled with colour and detail and an awesome synth-pop soundtrack, not to mention some incredibly charming cartoon animated cutscenes. And while these cutscenes are devoid of any voice-work, and can be more reminiscent of janky flash animation than the cartoons of the 80s that inspired them, it’s hard not to be endeared to the amount of love and effort that went into making them.

That’s really the thing about Crossing Souls: it definitely has its flaws, however, I really can’t help but cherish the amount of love and heart that went into it. Its problems are more disappointing because you can see where a little tightening would’ve made for a better experience and probably would’ve warranted a higher score. But that aside, Crossing Souls is definitely a fantastic experience, and I would highly recommend playing it.

Crossing Souls (PC) Review - Lost Boys 7
Crossing Souls (PC) – image for this review provided by Fourratic and Devolver Digital.

Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out Jordan Biordi’s reviews of Metroid: Samus Returns and Pokkén Tournament DX for the Nintendo Switch!

Want to see more videos? Subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out the First 15: Monster Hunter World Beta: the Insatiable Nergigante, Dissidia Final Fantasy NT,  Star Wars Battlefront II, Sonic Forces + Episode Shadow, and  Super Mario Odyssey!

Don’t forget to tune in every Friday the Pixels & Ink Podcast to hear the latest news, previews, and in-depth game discussions!

Never miss when new CGM articles go out by following us on Twitter and Facebook!

CGMagazine is Canada’s premiere comics and gaming magazine. Subscribe today to get the best of CGM delivered right to your door! Never miss when a new issue goes live by subscribing to our newsletter! Signing up gives you exclusive entry into our contest pool. Sign up once, you’ll have a chance to win! Sign up today!

Pixels & Ink Episode #282: Shadow of the Nintendo

Pixels & Ink Episode #282: Shadow of the Nintendo

This week, Brendan, Phil, Jordan, and Lisa take a look at the latest news from Hollywood and the gaming scene. In reviews, the team looks at Before We Vanish, Shadow of the Colossus and Crossing Souls.

Read morePixels & Ink Episode #282: Shadow of the Nintendo

Enter The Gungeon (Switch) Mini-Review – Gungeon Crawling on the Go

Enter The Gungeon (Switch) Mini-Review - Gungeon Crawling on the Go

For a little while it felt as though the success of the Roguelike games saw several indie devs clamouring to create the next Binding of Isaac, but only a handful of games did it right. Enter the Gungeon is one of those games and now it’s been locked-and-loaded onto the Nintendo Switch and gungeoneering has never been better.

Enter The Gungeon (Switch) Mini-Review - Gungeon Crawling on the Go 6
Enter the Gungeon (Nintendo Switch) – gameplay image via Dodge Roll Games and Devolver Digital.

Since Enter the Gungeon released last April and CGM did a pretty comprehensive review of it, I won’t go into laborious detail about the game. Not much has changed for the Nintendo Switch version—in fact nothing has, and that’s okay. You don’t need to fix what isn’t broken. It’s still the same nail-biting, tightly controlled, top-down shooter with—literal—bullet-hell elements, and it still has hundreds of guns, a few I will now list:

  • The Wind-Up Gun from the Futurama episode, “War is the H-Word”
  • The Law Giver from Judge Dredd
  • The LAPD 2019 Blaster from Blade Runner
  • The Zapper from Duck Hunt
  • The Plasma Blaster from Earthworm Jim
Enter The Gungeon (Switch) Mini-Review - Gungeon Crawling on the Go 5
Enter the Gungeon (Nintendo Switch) – gameplay image via Dodge Roll Games and Devolver Digital.

I know I probably sound like a broken record with most games I review for the Switch, but what I love most is how perfectly suited Enter the Gungeon is to Nintendo’s console. It was after playing The Binding of Isaac—which I maintain is at its best on a handheld platform—that I wished Enter the Gungeon could see a handheld release, given that the two games are so similar in style. In that regard, EtG is probably at its best on the Switch. Because the action takes place room-to-room, the pace is completely set by the player—making it perfect for quick bursts in handheld mode or long-plays in docked.

Enter The Gungeon (Switch) Mini-Review - Gungeon Crawling on the Go 2
Enter the Gungeon (Nintendo Switch) – gameplay image via Dodge Roll Games and Devolver Digital.

If Enter the Gungeon suffers from anything, it’s the Switch hardware itself, namely the Joy-Cons. It’s no secret that the Joy-Con sticks are somehow simultaneously stiff yet touchy and for a twin-stick shooter that can make aiming a bit of a gamble. Also, the game automatically maps both shoot and dodge to R and L respectively, instead of ZR and ZL, which I thought was strange. If you, like me, decide to map to the triggers, you’ll suddenly notice how stiff they are compared to say and Xbox or PS4 controller. These are more nitpicky complaints than anything serious, and while it could be a little awkward at times, I found it was never that much of a bother to seriously impact gameplay, especially not when the trade-off is handheld capability.

Enter the Gungeon is incredibly stylish with an amazing pixel art aesthetic and charming gun themed enemies that are at times both adorable and frightening. The gameplay is fast-paced and difficult without being cheap and it possesses a rich and interesting lore, with several layers underneath the seemingly obvious “shoot your way until the end”. With hundreds of unique guns (proper unique, not Borderlands “let’s just paint the same four guns different colours” unique) and an incredible soundtrack, Enter the Gungeon on the Switch is an absolute bullseye.

Enter The Gungeon (Switch) Mini-Review - Gungeon Crawling on the Go 1
Enter the Gungeon (Nintendo Switch) – gameplay image via Dodge Roll Games and Devolver Digital.

Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out Jordan Biordi’s reviews of Metroid: Samus Returns and Pokkén Tournament DX for the Nintendo Switch!

Want to see more videos? Subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out the First 15: Star Wars Battlefront II, Sonic Forces + Episode Shadow, and  Super Mario Odyssey!

Don’t forget to tune in every Friday the Pixels & Ink Podcast to hear the latest news, previews, and in-depth game discussions!

Never miss when new CGM articles go out by following us on Twitter and Facebook!

CGMagazine is Canada’s premiere comics and gaming magazine. Subscribe today to get the best of CGM delivered right to your door! Never miss when a new issue goes live by subscribing to our newsletter! Signing up gives you exclusive entry into our contest pool. Sign up once, you’ll have a chance to win! Sign up today!

High Hell (PC) Review: A Hell of a Ride

High Hell (PC) Review: A Hell of a Ride

Something that always catches my eye when I watch TV shows or movies is when people are shown playing video games that obviously don’t exist. Two people sitting together on a couch, playing an untitled first-person shooter and talking about getting the highest score. These always sounded cool to me as a kid but as I got older, I began to question why anybody would play these awful looking made up titles. High Hell is a game that instantly reminded me of those non-existent games, except it actually manages to work most of the time.

High Hell (PC) Review: A Hell of a Ride 3
High Hell (PC) – gameplay image via Devolver Digital

High Hell is an action shooter that has players fighting through the criminal underworld in a series of fast-paced missions. I would speak more on the game’s plot but there is none. Even that one line of information I just gave was something I had to find on Devolver Digital’s website because the game offers nothing, aside from the goals of individual missions. High Hell’s lack of a story works in its favour though when you’re taking on random missions like stealing artwork or rescuing chimps.

From a visual standpoint, High Hell uses a retro polygon look similar to something you’d find on the Sega Dreamcast. Alongside its almost entirely nonexistent HUD, these graphics add a lot of charm to High Hell’s old school gameplay. One problem with this style, however, is its overuse of the same colours, specifically grey. After a few missions, everything starts to look the same.

High Hell (PC) Review: A Hell of a Ride 2
High Hell (PC) – gameplay image via Devolver Digital

In the spirit of the games that High Hell is trying to emulate, it has extremely simple controls. You can move around, shoot, crouch and perform a kick or interact with certain objects. There’s no weapon cycling to think about or even reloading. High Hell’s simple controls makes it easy to pick up and play which works well with the game’s bite-sized missions, never taking more than about ten minutes.

The style infused into High Hell is one of its most obvious strong suits. Being able to do things like burn stacks of money or having to jump off the map and parachuting away at the end of every mission. Every action you can perform feels like it’s straight out of an 80’s action movie or an early 90’s video game. One of the actions that is most important to the gameplay is being able to bust doors down. Now, I get how important an action like this is to simulate being a badass but this action is where most of my problems stem from with High Hell. In each mission, you’re breaking into a criminal hideout with rooms full of enemies. The problem is that the second you open that door, there’s usually already at least two enemies already prepared to get their shot in. It can result in cheap deaths, forcing you to memorize the enemy layout just to get through certain areas. This problem led to me coming up with equally cheap and ultimately boring strategy of opening a door, standing next to it and shooting continuously while the enemies blindly walked out to look for me.

High Hell (PC) Review: A Hell of a Ride 4
High Hell (PC) – gameplay image via Devolver Digital

High Hell is a great game to play in short bursts. It’s quirky, fast-paced, and plays well aside from a few oversights. Though there’s a variety of different mission objectives, things always end with eliminating all the enemies on the map, resulting in the gameplay getting a bit stale after too long. You can easily load High Hell up, play a couple of missions and then return for more later.


Liked this article and want to read more like it? Find out why Remington thinks Fire Emblem Warriors exceeds all expectations, or why Sonic Mania earns its spot next to the titles released during Sonic’s golden era!

Want to see more videos? Subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out the First 15 – The evil Within 2, Forza Motorsport 7, and Cuphead!

Don’t forget to tune in every Friday the Pixels & Ink Podcast to hear the latest news, previews, and in-depth game discussions!

Never miss when new CGM articles go out by following us on Twitter and Facebook!

CGMagazine is Canada’s premiere comics and gaming magazine. Subscribe today to get the best of CGM delivered right to your door! Never miss when a new issue goes live by subscribing to our newsletter! Signing up gives you exclusive entry into our contest pool. Sign up once, you’ll have a chance to win! Sign up today!

Ruiner (PC) Review – In a Bloody Trance

Ruiner (PC) Review - In a Bloody Trance

The bloodshed in Ruiner is hypnotic in its franticness. Managing three or four foes who are shooting and lashing out at you, dashing from enemy to enemy as you grab whatever gun is lying around in order to fight back, all while throbbing club beats pound your ears makes Ruiner into a heady experience. However, the spell it weaves eventually wears thin, leaving players with an experience the feels a little too repetitive after a time.

Ruiner (PC) Review 6
Ruiner (PC) – gameplay image credit: Devolver Digital and Reikon Games

The combat in Ruiner is gloriously chaotic. Enemies will come rushing in from all sides, some with melee weapons and others with guns, all aiming to end your life. Players will have to learn how to manage this within milliseconds, prioritizing targets while quickly using all of the abilities at their disposal in just the right way. Combat, by necessity, grabs the player’s attention and never lets go, keeping players firmly invested and interested in each fight.

Players have access to a lot of powers. They can hack enemies to make them work for the player, drop temporary shields on the field, create a bullet-deflecting barrier, heal, call for backup guns to be dropped in for them, and several other powers. Players can choose which of these to equip or power up on the fly, too, as the game allows players to spend or remove upgrade nodes any time they like, trying out different abilities should one character build not be working out, or if they suddenly need to use a specific power to survive one particular fight.

This is all on top of an emphasis on working with whatever’s lying around. Enemies always drop their weapons as you kill them, and most guns have only a few shots before the ammo expended, leaving players with the default guns. It’s always a good idea to pick up someone else’s gun over the default, so players will always be using new firearms, and always adapting to them. It makes combat feel even more shifting and surprising in each moment, turning players into ever-adapting killers.

Ruiner (PC) Review 8
Ruiner (PC) – gameplay image credit: Devolver Digital and Reikon Games

This constant pressure in combat—to deal with enemies on all sides, to choose what powers you need that second, to pick up the right tools to fight back—keeps each fight exhilarating. Slapping enemies around in this world rarely gets old, as the game’s tough, prolonged battles and endless need for player adaptation means never just idly attacking without paying attention. Combat demands full focus, and that focus feels well-rewarded when the game’s foes finally back off.

However, the combat in Ruiner isn’t quite as appealing as it could be. For a game so focused on clobbering enemies, weapons lack any sort of appreciable, visible impact. Hitting or shooting foes just makes them twitch slightly or not react at all; a small detail that robs combat of a sense of weight or power. Likewise, the weapon sound effects have little sense of impact as well (likely taking a back seat to the excellent soundtrack). There’s little sense of power to firing a gun or hitting someone, which makes it feel like you’re hitting airy punching bags. It steals a bit away from what is otherwise an excellent combat scheme.

The soundtrack is a solid trade, though. The game throbs and pulses with club tracks, pushing the player along with driving beats. There’s a sense in the music that the whole game is a sort of dance, with players moving along in a bloody trance to the song. It encourages players to lose themselves in the violence and chaos and music, just giving in and flowing along with it.

Ruiner (PC) Review 7
Ruiner (PC) – gameplay image credit: Devolver Digital and Reikon Games

It all works for some time, too, but eventually, rough edges start to poke through Ruiner. While combat draws the player in with its frantic nature, it all feels a little bit the same after a while. The game will have melee classes striking at you as gunners hang back, and while the sci-fi weapons constantly change, this is basically how each attack goes. Managing the nuances of each arena and some of the special powers enemy have adds some variety, and the game tosses so many foes at the player over time that pure challenge keeps the fights interesting, but it really feels like the same fight, over and over, after you play for an extended period.

Ruiner (PC) Review 5
Ruiner (PC) – gameplay image credit: Devolver Digital and Reikon Games

Likewise, locations all feel very same-y. Despite some eerie graffiti in a few areas or hints of interesting environments, it all feels like stark, overly-similar futuristic places. Mechanical factories give way to the mechanical plants, and all of it is made up of meandering corridors that are only there to serve as obvious locations to fight in. It’s all very dull to look at, which only heightens that sense that you’re fighting the same battle repeatedly, and not even in different locations.

The game does have some bits of visual design brilliance. The game features a hub city players return to between stages that is filled with neon signs for filthy nightclubs and glimmering adds shimmering in the polluted haze. Gangs, crooked cops, and futuristic chop shops line the streets, giving the city a visual appeal while also helping ground Ruiner in a living reality.

Ruiner (PC) Review 3
Ruiner (PC) – gameplay image credit: Devolver Digital and Reikon Games

This loses some of its appeal when it becomes clear it’s just a hub for busywork. Players will meander around this area for a few minutes to get their next mission, which typically involves going to the same guy to get another bit of story that could have been told in a quick cutscene. Otherwise, players can pick up side tasks here that give them extra rewards for doing stuff they would normally do in each stage anyway, like kill bosses or collect hidden items. It helps build a world for Ruiner, but from a play perspective, it feels like a bit of a pointless deviation.

Ruiner is a dizzying affair when in combat, offering tons of things for players to weigh and consider as music pounds their senses. It’s not something that lasts, though, as the game’s reliance on similar-looking mechanical plants and only a handful of enemy attack types takes away from its appeal. It’s fun for a time, and while its challenge may keep the game interesting throughout, for some, its lack of variety may make it overly repetitive.


Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out Joel’s review of Dishonored: Death of the Outsider, or his review of Tokyo Dark!

Want to see the game in action? Check out our First 15 of Ruiner!

Never miss when new CGM articles go out by following us on Twitter and Facebook!

Want to see more videos? Subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out the First 15 – Dishonored: Death of the Outsider and Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony!

Don’t forget to tune in every Friday the Pixels & Ink Podcast to hear the latest news, previews, and in-depth game discussions!

CGMagazine is Canada’s premiere comics and gaming magazine. Subscribe today to get the best of CGM delivered right to your door! Never miss when a new issue goes live by subscribing to our newsletter! Signing up gives you exclusive entry into our contest pool. Sign up once, you’ll have a chance to win! Sign up today!

First 15: Ruiner – First Stage

First 15: Ruiner - First Stage

CGM Takes you through the first 15 minutes of the new, punishing, top-down, action shooter from Reikon Games and Devolver Digital, Ruiner. As an added bonus, we take you through the end-stage boss.

Set in the year 2091 in the cyber metropolis, Rengkok, Ruiner tells the story of a “wired sociopath” who fights against a corrupt establishment to save his kidnapped brother. With the help of a mysterious hacker, players explore the beautifully animated, cyberpunk world, collect a wide array of weapons to build their arsenal, and gain abilities to help them take down their enemies.

Ruiner, the debut title from Warsaw-based developer ReikonGames, is available, today, on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC through Steam and GOG.


Want to see more videos? Subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out the First 15 – Dishonored: Death of the Outsider and Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony!

Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out Joel Couture’s review of Ruiner! You should also check out Jesse Cabral’s review of the latest fighter to come out of Devolver Digital, Absolver!

Never miss when new CGM articles go out by following us on Twitter and Facebook!

Don’t forget to tune in every Friday the Pixels & Ink Podcast to hear the latest news, previews, and in-depth game discussions!

CGMagazine is Canada’s premiere comics and gaming magazine. Subscribe today to get the best of CGM delivered right to your door! Never miss when a new issue goes live by subscribing to our newsletter! Signing up gives you exclusive entry into our contest pool. Sign up once, you’ll have a chance to win! Sign up today!

Absolver (PC) Review—Master Your Kung-Fu

Absolver (PC) Review—Master Your Kung-Fu

I’ve spent the better part of the last two weeks in a world of constant fighting. My time there has felt like I was the star in a Kung-Fu movie, throwing together punches and kicks that would make any fight choreographer jealous. The game I’m talking about is Sloclap’s Absolver. A game where players are put into a strange world where all they know is to fight.

Read moreAbsolver (PC) Review—Master Your Kung-Fu

Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes Will Include Indie Crossovers

Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes Will Include Indie Crossovers

After being announced at Nintendo’s Switch reveal, the latest game in the No More Heroes franchise was a huge question mark. Suda51, the series’ creator, was coy about what the gameplay would be, cautioning the media to not refer to it as “No More Heroes 3“. We now know why that is, as the first trailer for Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes has been released along the Nintendo Nindies Showcase.

Travis Strikes Again takes place seven years after the events of the original game, with The Bad, the father of NMH‘s Bad Girl, coming to exact revenge on Travis for killing her. During their scuffle in a trailer, the game console Travis was using activates, dragging the duo into the digital world.

Things haven’t been fully elaborated, but the current thought is that Travis must now fight through the worlds of indie games, eventually squaring off with characters from the game. Hotline Miami was featured prominently in the trailer, making the thought of Travis facing down against Jacket or Biker from Hotline oh so enticing.

Another interesting thing to note is the game console Travis and The Bad get sucked into. It’s a Death Drive mk 2, a similar console to the Death Drive 128 featured in another Suda51 title, Let It Die that allows the player to enter the Tower of Barbs and fight enemies in that game. Who knows if this is a fun shout out, or if Uncle Death himself will make an appearance.

Travis Strikes Again: No More Heroes will launch sometime next year exclusively on Switch, and between now and then we’ll most likely be hearing the other five promised indie crossover games will be. So far it seems like Devolver is heavily invested in the title, but I’d personally love to see more variety. Travis Touchdown fighting Shovel Knight, anyone?

Serious Sam’s Bogus Detour Review – Tough and Gritty

Serious Sam's Bogus Detour Review - Tough and Gritty

Serious Sam is one of those franchises that will probably never die due to its dedicated fan base. Its ideas are entrenched in old school shooter sensibilities, an archetype that’s dying out due to “hero shooters” and other highly refined “games as services” concepts taking over our wallets.

Read moreSerious Sam’s Bogus Detour Review – Tough and Gritty