Electronic Arts, ESPN, Disney XD and the NFL Partner Up for Competitive Gaming Agreement

Electronic Arts, ESPN, Disney XD and the NFL Partner Up for Competitive Gaming Agreement

Electronic Arts (EA) and the National Football League (NFL) announced that they are joining forces with ESPN and Disney XD for exclusive broadcasts of the upcoming EA Sports Madden NFL 18 Championship series. The partnership starts the final rounds of the EA Sports Madden NFL 18 Club Championship as well as the new EA Sports Madden NFL Ultimate League. This marks ESPN’s first long term, multi-event competitive gaming agreement.

Read moreElectronic Arts, ESPN, Disney XD and the NFL Partner Up for Competitive Gaming Agreement

The Sims 4 (PS4) Review – SIMply Monotonous

The Sims 4 (PS4) Review - SIMply Monotonous

I never really got into The Sims. I played the original way back in the day when it was released on the Gamecube, but I think I spent more time building a really cool house with the unlimited money cheat than actually playing the game. I thought MySims was kind of cute on the Wii, but other than that the series never really hooked me.

I just never saw the appeal of playing a game that tried to emulate the monotony of daily life, at least not without some kind of hook. Sure, Animal Crossing’s  bread and butter is basically the monotony of everyday life, but at least that game lets you hang out with a talking cat in a Power Rangers helmet.

Going into The Sims 4, I wasn’t really sure what to expect. It’s been so long and there have been so many entries into The Sims franchise; who knew how much content could be packed into the 4th and most modern game? Unfortunately, what I got was a testament to tedium; I know The Sims has a pretty big fanbase, but playing this only made me question why.

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The Sims 4 (PS4) – gameplay image via Maxis and EA

From a gameplay perspective, The Sims 4 is about the same as I remember. You make a Sim, build a house, furnish it with the essentials and a few recreational items and then watch your Sim take part in the daily grind, repeatedly reminding it to eat, sleep, poop, and bathe. You get your Sim a job, help it to make friends, find love, all that fun stuff. And while I can see why theoretically that can be enjoyable to some people—and I’ll admit there is a certain addictiveness to it—what it boiled down to for me was a game about watching bars go down, and having to make sure they go back up.

That’s it. The Sims are the most needy creatures in video game history, and far beyond basic abilities such as eating when they need to, or going to the bathroom without your constant instruction. Managing one was beyond annoying, and got worse when my Sim had his girlfriend move in with him, and now I had to manage two of these complete buffoons. And beyond the basic necessity bars, the Sims have emotional quantifiers, so a hard day at work would make them stressed out and I would have to spend time I could’ve been using to better my Sim to calm him down with baths and venting to his girlfriend.

But the real problem with The Sims 4 on PS4 is how poorly optimized it is for console. It reeks of a game that takes the same interface as its PC counterpart and just slaps it on a controller. Icons are mapped to the corners of the screen, moving the joystick will cycle between them one by one like a badly designed NES password screen. Clicking the touchpad will shift you to “mouse mode” but the control of the mouse is pathetic, picking up a crazy amount of momentum at any prolonged hold and swinging wildly out of control. Menus and sub-menus are tedious to navigate—again, you can see how this would’ve worked had you had a mouse with proper control, but on a PS4 controller it’s an absolute chore.

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The Sims 4 (PS4) – gameplay image via Maxis and EA

And while this isn’t so bad while you’re playing the game proper, it’s beyond frustrating when trying to build anything in The Sims 4. Which is to say nothing of the pathetic camera controls while building; how walls and items swing out of place when turning the camera, the two camera angles you get that range from a slight 45 degree angle to Bird’s Eye View. How you need to click out of every menu if you want to undo or redo any action. My whole neighborhood consists of one single house, because I couldn’t fathom trying to build an entire community with these controls.

And The Sims 4 runs pretty pathetically too. It was particularly bad while in the “Build Mode; ”after building a pretty small house and putting, honestly only a few items into it, it began chugging at 10 frames per second and there were a few moments in the “Life Mode” where began to seize up. Shifting from the “Life Mode” to the “Build Mode” chugged so hard I honestly held my breath in anticipation of a crash. Sure the game looks fine, characters have a cartoonish style that removes them from reality and adds to the silliness of the whole Sims affair, and the music and sound quality isn’t bad, but that’s about it.

The Sims 4 (PS4) Review - SIMply Monotonous
The Sims 4 (PS4) – gameplay image via Maxis and EA

Oh and it’s definitely worth mentioning all the DLC that comes with The Sims 4, and by “comes with this game” I mean, EA allowing you the privilege to purchase DLC for a three-year-old game that is being re-released on consoles. This includes the $54 CDN “City Living Pack,” the $27 CDN “Vampire Pack”, and the $14 CDN “Vintage Glamor Pack.” One extra area, some costumes and “abilities” that you’re expected to buy again, to say nothing of the $80 CDN “Deluxe Party Edition” that doesn’t even come with any of these expansion packs.

Like I said, I know The Sims has its fans, and I could probably see why. Like Harvest Moon or Animal Crossing, there’s a certain amount of joy you get from creating something and watching it flourish. But I personally cannot understand the appeal. At the end of the day, it’s a game about watching bars deplete and then fill up with a half-decent house building minigame built in. Maybe I’d have enjoyed The Sims 4 more on PC, and maybe you would too. Skip this one.


Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out Jordan Biordi’s reviews of Metroid: Samus Returns and Pokkén Tournament DX for the Nintendo Switch!

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Wall Street experts say players are overreacting to Star Wars Battlefront II controversy

Star Wars Battlefront 2 Preview:  A Campaign Worthy of Vader

According to the Wall Street firm KeyBanc Capital Market, players are overreacting to the EA Star Wars Battlefront II controversy.

“We view the negative reaction to Star Wars Battlefront 2 (and industry trading sympathy) as an opportunity to add to Electronic Arts, Take-Two, and Activision Blizzard positions. The handling of the SWBF2 launch by EA has been poor; despite this, we view the suspension of MTX in the near term as a transitory risk.”

Wingren continued by saying  that despite the reaction, video game players aren’t overcharged, they’re undercharged, and that the contention and blowback were a result of a “perfect storm for overreaction” given the parties involved included EA, the Star Wars franchise, Reddit, and “purist gaming journalists/outlets” who disapprove of micro-transactions.

Since the Star Wars controversy, EA stocks have dropped 9 per cent, with the main being culprit being micro-transactions according to Wall Street experts. Taking a look at the metrics of game data sales, the average $60 game plus an additional $20 for micro-transactions is about 40 cents for 2.5 hours of gameplay a day. Watching television is an estimated 60 to 65 cents per hour, or 80 cents per hour for a movie rental.

“If you take a step back and look at the data, an hour of video game content is still one of the cheapest forms of entertainment,” he wrote. “Quantitative analysis shows that video game publishers are actually charging gamers at a relatively inexpensive rate, and should probably raise prices.”

“Despite its inconvenience to the popular press narrative, if you like Star Wars and play video games at an average rate, you’re far better off skipping the movie and playing the game to get the most bang for your buck,” Wingren added.

Wingren did not comment on the even more controversial “loot box” uproar, but following the report Activision Blizzard shares dropped 0.8 per cent Monday, Electronic Arts declined 1.4 per cent, and Take-Two fell 0.5 per cent.


Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out  Byran Calhoun’s review of Star Wars Battlefront II and our review of Justice League (2017)

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EA Temporarily Removes Microtransactions From Star Wars Battlefront II

Star Wars Battlefront 2 (PS4) Review – Some Games Fall to the Dark Side of Micro-Transactions.

Just hours before the global release of Star Wars Battlefront II, EA has announced that all microtransactions within the title will be turned off until further notice.

The shocking announcement can be found on EA’s official website. Oskar Gabrielson, General Manager over at DICE, stated that after listening to the outcry from fans over the recent controversy surrounding Star Wars Battlefront II, EA felt that removing all real money related transactions within the game until further notice would give the company time to reassess, listen and address concerns regarding the title.

This change comes prior to the actual release of the game which comes out this Friday, November 17. No word on when and how microtransactions will come back to the title as of the writing of this post.

It’s nice to see EA listen and promptly respond to the situation. Hopefully, this change will get more people to support the game, without worrying about microtransaction related woes.


Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out  Byran Calhoun’s review of Star Wars Battlefront II and our review of Justice League (2017)

Want to see more videos? Subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out the First 15: Star Wars Battlefront II, Sonic Forces + Episode Shadow, and  Super Mario Odyssey!

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Battlefront II Devs Host AMA on Reddit to Address Concerns

Battlefront II Devs Host AMA on Reddit to Address Concerns

An AMA on Reddit surrounding the Battlefront II controversy offered no definitive answers or responses to the concerns of players, consisting mostly of vague responses from DICE developers that offered very little in the way of actually addressing the problems.

John Wasilczyk, Executive Producer, Dennis Brannval, Associate Design Director, and Paul Keslin, producer, were on hand to answer questions from players today in the Battlefront II AMA. Unfortunately, as was expected, the devs skirted around revealing any solid information or committing to specifics, choosing to engage in obfuscating and blatantly vague responses.

Particularly damning was a response to the following question from Reddit user AsexualAmeba:

“My job keeps me incredibly busy, and, often times, I just want to come home and relax against AI. I’ve noticed that the amount of credits is capped per day in arcade mode to 500. With crate’s current cost, I would have to max the system out for eight days in a row to afford just one crate. Do you have any plans to change up the arcade values so more casual players like me could afford more than 2 or 3 loot crates a month?”

Paul Keslin replied by saying:

“As we want to let players earn Credits offline via a more relaxed game mode, we needed to also find a way to make sure it wouldn’t be exploited in a way that would impact Multiplayer. Because of that we made the decision to limit the number of Credits earned to stop potential abuse. We will be looking at data continually and make adjustments to make things as balanced as possible.”

The response led to an outpouring of comments and criticisms from users who demanded to know why the Pay to Win lootbox mechanic, which severely impacts gameplay, was included if they were so concerned about balance and fairness in online multiplayer—but one that garners the company plenty of revenue and can be viewed as the single most controversial aspect of the game.

Unsurprisingly, there was no answer provided.

Various other questions were posed that also elicited safe, carefully constructed responses from the developers that did little to address the actual issues being presented and if anything further enflamed and enraged Reddit users and Battlefront II players.

Cheesegrater78 asked:

“Are you aware that it will take a gamer who plays 2 hours per day over 6 years in order to unlock all of the content? Don’t you think that is a bit unfair that a large portion of content will be unaccessible for those who have other responsibilities like work, school, in a game they paid for? 2. Will you be looking to lower the number of microtransactions in the future? 3. Do you have any comment on the cool down to earn credits? Will it be lowered or removed in the future? Any concern that this will make the grind even more challenging for players who don’t buy microtransactions?”

To which John Wasilczyk replied:

“We’ve seen the speculation about how long it takes players to earn things – but our averages based on the Play First trial are much faster than what’s out there. But as more players come in, that could change. We’re committed to making progression a fun experience for all of our players. Nothing should feel unattainable and if it does, we’ll do what it takes to make sure it’s both fun and achievable. As we update and expand Arcade mode, we’ll be working towards making sure that players can continue to progress without daily limits.”

Once again, an expectedly canned and ambiguous reply that basically boils down to: we are (maybe) working on this and will (maybe, but probably not) change things to a degree players will be happy with.

Perhaps one of the most direct, no-nonsense post came from DreadPirate616, who asked the question that basically sums up the singular, major issue plaguing the game’s reception:

“Lootboxes should be removed. These ruin the feeling of accomplishment, are a form of gambling, and are obviously an incentive for players to buy credits using micro-transactions. Currently, Battlefront feels like a free mobile game, not a $60-$80 AAA title. There should be absolutely no micro-transactions that affect progression. While we recognize that you need money to continue creating free DLC, it should not come at the expense of fair gameplay. A compromise can be limiting lootboxes to cosmetic items only, so you can still make money.”

Dennis Brannvall responded by explaining…well, not a whole lot. Nor did he offer any solution outside of general “we’re looking into it” (not an actual quote from Brannvall)

“I think crates can be a fun addition as long as you don’t feel forced to engage with them in order to progress. I feel that’s where the issue is with our game right now and that’s where we’ll look to solve as quickly as we can. We’re looking to add additional ways to progress your favorite character or class, while allowing crates to be a fun thing for those who want to engage with them.”

As to why Battlefront II came ready to rock with all these contentious features, despite being otherwise well received and praised for its visuals, environments, and actual minute-to-minute gameplay, Reddit user TheBlazingAnus asked:

“I want to preface this by saying that I loved the beta, particularly the multiplayer and visuals, however, there has been quite a negative reception of the progression system. The game sports a 1.1 average user review from over 1600 ratings on Meta Critic, with other major gaming outlets and publications citing the inclusion of the loot crate-based progression system as the major reason for their dissatisfaction of the game. I was hoping you would let us know what led you to make the decision with the current progression system, and, do you plan to implement any major changes to the progression system moving forward?”

Brannvall didn’t exactly answer the question. Nor did he offer up an explanation of the process that led to the inclusion of Pay to Win mechanics and a broken, manipulative progression system. Instead, users were greeted with yet another response that made no direct promises or presented any concrete facts or clarification.

“Yes. I don’t feel you can take yourself seriously as a developer on a live game if you’re not willing to completely challenge your own system and consider overhauls. I can’t really commit to the dates just yet, but we’re looking at solutions where players have a clearer, more direct path to getting the stuff you want.”

However, amongst all the political deflection, safe, guarded responses, and indirect promises, Brannvall finally addressed the elephant in the room directly after HockeyBrawler09 asked:

“Does EA just not realize if they gave in to what consumers wanted by removing loot boxes and gross microtransactions they’d be setting themselves up for longterm profits and possibly a positive relationship with their base which could flood into other genres/markets? Or is short term profit the only goal?”

Brannvall answered the question with surprising specificity, even using the term “microtransactions”, although the reply itself still reeked of PR damage control and did not actually offer any explanation for the inclusion of the mechanic or its blatant purpose of simply generating revenue.

“Regarding microtransactions, we want players to enjoy their progression through the game and want gameplay to be fair along the way. Microtransactions are there for player choice, but won’t be a requirement to play or succeed at the game. And like everything else, we’ll continue tweaking and tuning until we achieve these goals.”

The AMA has now been sorted with links to each question and answer and can be viewed here. Follow CGMagazine for more updates as the storm continues.


Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out more of Brendan Quinn’s work such as his look at the relationship between comics and Hip-Hop, why the Witcher 3 was not as great as everyone thinks, and or which historical stories he thinks should be made into videogames!

Want to see more videos? Subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out the First 15: Star Wars Battlefront II, Sonic Forces + Episode Shadow, and  Super Mario Odyssey!

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CGMagazine is Canada’s premiere comics and gaming magazine. Subscribe today to get the best of CGM delivered right to your door! Never miss when a new issue goes live by subscribing to our newsletter! Signing up gives you exclusive entry into our contest pool. Sign up once, you’ll have a chance to win! Sign up today!

First Fifteen: Star Wars Battlefront II

First Fifteen: Star Wars Battlefront II

CGM’s Bryan Calhoun takes you on an epic adventure in Star Wars Battlefront II.

Star Wars Battlefront II offers fans the most robust Star Wars experience ever that spans across all three eras of the universe with nearly triple the content than Star Wars Battlefront. In addition to the multitude of new features for multiplayer like space battles re-built from the ground up, Star Wars Battlefront II offers an authentic, untold single-player story that follows Inferno Squad Special Forces Commander Iden Versio. She is played by actress Janina Gavankar, as she brings to life the events following the destruction of the Death Star II in Star Wars: Return of the Jedi.”

Star Wars Battlefront II is available now for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC.


Want to see more videos? Subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out the First 15: Super Mario Odyssey,  The Evil Within 2, and Cuphead!

Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out CGM’s interview with EA Motive, the studio behind Star Wars Battlefront II! While you’re at it, check out more of Bryan Calhoun’s reviews such as Destiny 2, Dead By Daylight Special Edition, and Madden NFL 18!

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CGMagazine is Canada’s premiere comics and gaming magazine. Subscribe today to get the best of CGM delivered right to your door! Never miss when a new issue goes live by subscribing to our newsletter! Signing up gives you exclusive entry into our contest pool. Sign up once, you’ll have a chance to win! Sign up today!

Star Wars Battlefront 2 Controversy Prior To Imminent Release

EA Announces Star Wars BattleFront II Beta, Slated For October

Star Wars Battlefront 2 is only a few days away from release, but a controversy regarding certain gameplay elements, as well as the company’s response to the criticism of these elements, is actively harming the hype surrounding the game.

Early reviewers concluded that it would take roughly 40 hours of gameplay to unlock certain hero characters within the multiplayer portion of Battlefront 2 without resorting to the alternative of having to pay and get immediate access.

EA’s initial response to the outcry from the fans was less than stellar, with the company stating that they felt players should “feel a sense of pride and accomplishment” for unlocking different heroes after the long 40-hour grind. In fact, the response was so poorly received that it became the most downvoted commented in Reddit history with a current score of -670,000.

Since then, EA has attempted damage control by reducing unlock costs by 75 per cent, from 40,000 points to about 10,000 for Leia, Chewbacca and the Emperor, where characters such as Luke and Vader went from 60,000 credits to 15,000. Finally, the main protagonist of Battlefront 2, Iden Versio, has now also been reduced to 5,000 credits to unlock for use in the multiplayer portion of the title.

“It’s a big change, and it’s one we can make quickly,” the post said. “It will be live today, with an update that is getting loaded into the game.”

Unfortunately, thanks to the efforts of Gameinformer‘s Andrew Reiner it has been confirmed that the Hero costs are not the only thing that has reduced by 75 per cent—the end-game completion for finishing the campaign has also been reduced to 5,000 credits from its prior 20,000 pool.

To make matters worse, EA seems to have put a limit on the number of credits players will be able to earn in Arcade mode through the use of a timer akin to ones found in various mobile games.

As of the writing of this post, EA has not commented on the reduction of the end-game credits or the Arcade Mode timer within Battlefront 2.


Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out  Brendan Frye’s interview with EA behind the story of Battlefront 2’s campaign and if you can’t get enough of franchises with the word Star in it, check out Robert B. Mark’s Seven Deadly words of Star Trek Discovery.

Want to see more videos? Subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out the First 15: Sonic Forces + Episode Shadow, Super Mario Odyssey, and Cuphead!

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CGMagazine is Canada’s premiere comics and gaming magazine. Subscribe today to get the best of CGM delivered right to your door! Never miss when a new issue goes live by subscribing to our newsletter! Signing up gives you exclusive entry into our contest pool. Sign up once, you’ll have a chance to win! Sign up today!

 

Need for Speed Payback (PlayStation 4) Review – A Great Game That Could Be Hampered by Microtransactions

Need for Speed Payback (PlayStation 4) Review - A Great Game That Could Be Hampered by Microtransactions

Let’s start by getting one very important point out of the way. Need for Speed Payback is not the Fast and Furious game we were all hoping for. The gameplay does not consist solely of over the top action sequences, there is no fast-talking lady’s man, and no one is wearing out the word family. Surprisingly, at least because of the way this game was advertised, Payback is more like Forza Horizon or Criterion’s beloved Burnout. In Need for Speed Payback you actually control three of Nevada’s best drivers, a little like what we saw in GTA V, as they challenge all of the state’s illegal street racers to illegal street races. As the puppet master of these digital drivers, your goal is to dominate the competition by winning races and eventually take on those Fast and Furious style missions. Repeat this cycle a few times and you’ll get into the area’s major racing event. Win that event and you get payback on those who have wronged you.

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Need For Speed Payback (PlayStation 4) – gameplay images via Ghost Games and Electronic Arts

In terms of explanations, I know this is a little spartan, but I am paraphrasing the plot for two important reasons. The first is that I don’t want to spoil the narrative for you, and the other is that the story makes little sense. This is a Need for Speed game, after all, so you should already expect a lot of poorly written dialogue wrapped in a story that only makes a little sense. To avoid spoilers, I will just say that the story buckles under the pressure of carrying the game, but it never breaks completely. More importantly, all the voice acting in this game is far better then what was available for the previous two Need for Speed games made by Ghost Games.

Luckily the story is only one of three major flaws that I found with this game, and the second flaw does not affect the gameplay at all; however, it might be the most annoying. For some reason, Payback suffers from long load times when booting, and by long times, I mean you have time to make a sandwich if you want. Once in the actual game space, you might have to wait 20 seconds here or there for a race to start, but nothing else felt unacceptable. When it really becomes annoying is when you want to play multiplayer right away. In these cases, you load up the single-player campaign, and then the same long loading time happens for the multiplayer. It feels like it takes forever to get going, but if you like sandwiches, and you don’t suffer from celiac disease—the immune reaction to eating gluten—you will be fine.

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Need For Speed Payback (PlayStation 4) – gameplay images via Ghost Games and Electronic Arts

My final issue is the fact that this game has been tuned in a way that you cannot make it through comfortably without loot boxes. I count myself lucky since CGMagazine was given the $100 premium edition of the game to review, so I had a ton of loot box currency dropped in my lap. The currency I earned from racing offline would not have been enough to proceed swiftly, and without the currency I was given, the pacing of this game would have felt completely wrong. Even with that currency, I did have to grind out a little, but nothing that really annoyed me. It is unfortunate but the sad truth is that the upgrades for your cars are just a little too expensive. Also, the cash you earn from doing events is just a little too finite to make the progression flow smoothly. The good news is that the game only requires a little tweaking of the in-game currency to fix its biggest issue. Yes, that is not great news right now, but it does mean Need for Speed Payback is easily fixed.

In the meantime, I feel like most people will simply race online to earn the cash they need for their car upgrades. Playing offline and online, in terms of how your vehicles perform, is nearly identical. Online races happen in a separate clone of the single-player map, and awards in multiplayer go back to upgrade your single player cars. Each multiplayer session is a playlist of races. Each player earns points for where they place in each race of the list, and the racer with the most points at the end will win the session. My only words of caution for the multiplayer section of this game is don’t go online your first day. Everyone is encouraged to use the single-player cars online, so those who have yet to upgrade their cars will lose to those who have spent a lot of time and money on their whips.

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Need For Speed Payback (PlayStation 4) – gameplay images via Ghost Games and Electronic Arts

I am pretty sure this won’t be an issue for many people because the cars of Need for Speed Payback feel stiff and heavy. It will take you about an hour or so to adapt to them, but once you do you can float between street racing, drifting, drag racing, off-roading, and being the getaway driver for heists. These getaway activities you are basically Jason Statham in the Transporter franchise, but you don’t take your shirt off to fight. You stay in the car and that is good because the racing is fun, and the roads you drive on were planned out with fun in mind.

This is why I enjoyed Need for Speed Payback so much. There are a lot of things to consider, but at the end of the day, the driving is just fun to do. Hitting that perfect drift angle makes you feel like a god, and beating a friend’s autolog record is the best gift you can give yourself. You will constantly feel like you are accomplishing things, and usually only by the skin of your teeth.  Even on the normal difficulty level, the AI drivers of Payback are no pushovers, and more than once I only won by hundredths of seconds. All of your efforts go into upgrading your cars, so before long you have grown attached to it as well. It helps that you don’t change vehicles much, but regardless each vehicle is a testament to your hard work. By the time you move to a better vehicle you feel like you are saying goodbye to an old friend.

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Need For Speed Payback (PlayStation 4) – gameplay images via Ghost Games and Electronic Arts

The racing events themselves are not bad either, but they are not as polished as the cars you are driving around in. My biggest issue with them is that some drag racing events can suddenly become rally racing around parts of the game space. This is an issue because Need for Speed Payback is all about having the right car for the right job, and dragsters are not the right tool for making turns at high speeds. On top of that, it got to the point that every off-road race looked like every other off-road race. I would say that this is more of an issue with the terrain of the game space then it is with the actual racing mechanics. The art assets of the game space look comparable to some of the best-looking games of this generation, but every grain of the digital desert you race around looks a lot like every other grain.

Need for Speed Payback is a fine game with far more organ music than expected of a 2017 release. Those of you who don’t enjoy it will not be able to complain about poor gameplay mechanics, but your concerns with other parts of the game would be valid. I have a feeling that the loot boxes will end up concerning people, but if it becomes a problem for the masses that can be easily fixed. What makes me happy is that the core elements of Payback are well polished. The cars are fun to drive, the events change enough to avoid being boring, roads are crafted with great drifts in mind, and the online racing brings people together for a good time. Payback is certainly not without its problems, but there are more pros then there are cons in this package. If you’re on the fence about this one, you can calm down and go buy it already. I don’t think anyone is going to name it game of the year, but you won’t regret adding it to your library.

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Need For Speed Payback (PlayStation 4) – gameplay images via Ghost Games and Electronic Arts

A retail version of the game reviewed was provided by the publisher. You can find additional information about CGMagazine’s ethics and review policies and procedures here.


Liked this article and want to read more like it? Check out more of Joel Couture’s reviews such as Destiny 2, Dead By Daylight Special Edition, and Madden NFL 18!

Want to see more videos? Subscribe to our YouTube channel and check out the First 15: Super Mario Odyssey,  The Evil Within 2, and Cuphead!

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CGMagazine is Canada’s premiere comics and gaming magazine. Subscribe today to get the best of CGM delivered right to your door! Never miss when a new issue goes live by subscribing to our newsletter! Signing up gives you exclusive entry into our contest pool. Sign up once, you’ll have a chance to win! Sign up today!