Is Marvel’s Loki the Disney Fairy Tale Fans Didn’t Want?

| Jul 13, 2021
Is Marvel’s Loki the Disney Fairy Tale Fans Didn’t Want?

This has been the year of the Marvel series taking over Disney+. I am an avid fan of the MCU, so of course I jumped on board with WandaVision, then Falcon and the Winter Soldier, and now, Loki. This is the one that has hooked me from the minute the first episode began, but unfortunately now, it has lost a little of the spark that made it so unique.

We go into episode six—the season finale—tomorrow, and though I’m very excited to see who or what is beyond Alioth, I worry that the show has breathed in one too many Disney fumes, which could lead to a fairy-tale ending that, as a fan, I am not looking for.

Is Marvel’s Loki The Disney Fairy Tale Fans Didn’t Want?

Loki is the God of Mischief, and though we have seen moments of humanity throughout his appearances in the MCU, ultimately he always reverts to serving himself first and foremost. While we follow Loki on his journey through the TVA, we see glimpses of pain, loneliness and regret, making viewers fall in love with Loki all over again. I was one of the ones smitten with his new character development, only to be completely put off by episode five.

“…a Loki only loves themselves, so the relationship is justified in a twisted sort of way

The first real dialogue we see from Loki in this episode is his plea to the other Loki’s to stop, explain what is going on, and come up with a plan—because Loki always has a plan. The speech felt forced and unnatural, setting the tone for the episode that was to come. His next big speech was equally forced, and led the scene into a Loki Royal Rumble which was filled with enough slapstick, campy comedy for an entire season of Looney Tunes. 

Is Marvel’s Loki The Disney Fairy Tale Fans Didn’t Want?

Episode five undid everything they had built and opted to appeal to people who enjoy a Disney comedy rather than a serious, moving storyline. The love story between Loki and Sylvie is rushed to say the least. Of course, a Loki only loves themselves, so the relationship is justified in a twisted sort of way, but in a six episode arc, there wasn’t enough time to really care about this bond. It was all a little too perfect, allowing them to finish the episode with a fairy-tale ending, complete with walking hand in hand off into the horizon. 

Now, before the hardcore Marvel fans come for me, this isn’t to say the series is spoiled. I’m still hooked on the story and I’m dying to find out what is on the other side of the void. Loki has managed to fill me with so many questions that I hope we get answers to. What is Renslayer’s real motive? Why are there only Loki variants here (save one Mobius, one Frog Thor, and some unseen cannibals)? Is the Alligator really a Loki?

Is Marvel’s Loki The Disney Fairy Tale Fans Didn’t Want?

So what does this mean for the finale? Honestly, I have no idea. Not even a guess. I’ve done my best to stay away from fan theories and spoilers from past comics. But I do know that I am hesitant to get my hopes up. I want Loki to finish with a bang—to meet his glorious purpose—and keep us clamouring for more with season two already announced, but I fear another walk into the sunset coming our way.  

All I really know is that when Hunter B-15 told Renslayer “You only want it, she NEEDS it,” I believed her, and I want to know why.  I hope they make it worth the wait, and don’t just finish on a classic Disney happy ending—that just isn’t Loki’s story.

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